Featured Installation: “Pig House” — a guest house renovation

Concept of Lea projectJake and Gretchen Lea bought their lovely farm in Berks County, Pennsylvania, in 1972, and raised their twins there. The twins grew up, and the Leas decided that they needed a more private place to stay when they visited their childhood home with their families. 

Gretchen is a designer, and saw our tiles at the Historic Home Show, in Valley Forge, Pennsylvania. She and Jake were planning a guest house on their property, and knew right away that our tiles would be ideal for the floors. Gretchen is full of imagination, and could see the possibilities in the touches of whimsy we could provide for her floors. In her work, she likes to include little “surprises” in the rooms she designs…which makes her a kindred spirit to Julie, owner/designer at Inglenook Tile.  

Jake enjoys piloting his small plane, so one day he and Gretchen flew to a small Lancaster County airport to see the tiles again. Julie picked them up at the airport, and brought them to the warehouse, so that they could see the full selection of styles and colors, and customize their order.  

In 2007, Jake and Gretchen decided to level the old pig sty on the property, where they raised pigs when the children were young. On the site, they built a new “pig sty” guest house, designed to complement the other buildings on the property. It has two bedrooms, a powder room, a full bath with a washer/dryer, a kitchen/dining room, a living room, and upstairs hallway. When Gretchen was planning the floors, she wanteFloor details lead a few tiles of pigs, to reflect the history of the old pig house that once stood on the site. We created a brick tile with an inset pig sculpture, to be placed randomly in the floor (see detail picture). 

Now when the twins visit, they stay in their own guesthouse. There are other guests that also enjoy the “pig house”; for example, a director from California recently took up residence there for a month and a half, while he worked with a local non-profit theater. Visitors can fish in the pond, swim in the pool, and walk the 2 fields of wildflowers on the Lea’s eighty acres of Berks County farmland. They have allowed their property to be used as a site for Geocaching (www.geocaching.com), and sometimes they enjoy seeing families digging for the “treasure” in their woods. Gretchen’s creativity is not yet satisfied with the “pig house” — she has plans to create additional living space in the tower silo.  

Lea kitchen

When asked how she feels about the tiles, now that they are installed, Gretchen says, “They fit in beautifully, and gave us a rustic look at a reasonable price.” She added that, as a designer, she appreciates working with companies that take pride in their work. 

Lea stairway 

If you are interested in working with Gretchen, she can be reached at glea316@ceinetworks.com, or at 610-367-6773. Her website is www.gleainteriordesign.com .

Feature Project: Chimneys and Hearths

Inglenook is the Scottish word for “chimney” and is often used to describe a warm central hearth in the homes of Northern Europe. Therefore, it is only fitting that this feature project is a collection of chimneys and hearths, installed in the home of a customer in the Philadelphia area.

David and Margaret, our customers, live in a beautiful traditional-style home in mainline Philadelphia. They first contacted our company and came to visit our warehouse in Winter of 2007 to pick out and order tile for their home. Since then, they have ordered from us two more times for other areas in their home! David and Margaret found Inglenook Tile because of they were unhappy with the plain tiles they had installed in their entryway and had decided that brick tile might give them the look they wanted. Margaret told us when we came to visit, “Now that these (Inglenook tiles) are down, we just love it! We’re sending you a family friend who wants to use these tiles, too.”

Below are the pictures of David and Margaret’s installations, a chimney, an entryway, and two hearths. (pictured above: their home. directly below: the beautiful hydrangeas in their front yard.) All the tiles shown are in Marietta color mix.

Click here to see a video of this installation.

It’s a little rough– our first time with our new video camera– but it gives you a feeling for the project.

We’ll start outside where David and Margaret used Lancaster Running Bond 2×8″ brick tiles and corner pieces to cover the outside of their chimney. You’d never know that it wasn’t full-sized antique brick!

Inside, we see the entryway that was David and Margaret’s first installation with Inglenook Tiles. They used Wright’s Ferry 4×8″ brick tiles in an offset basketweave pattern.

David and Margaret installed our brick tiles for two hearths as well. One of these hearths covers a large region around the hearth outlining a beautiful oriental rug. Both hearths used Wright’s Ferry 4×8″ brick tile.

First pictured is a closeup of the hearth. They used a herringbone pattern on the inside of the hearth base with a running bond border. The rest of the floor area is in a herringbone pattern. The second picture shows an image of the entire area. The final picture shows a clear detail of the herringbone pattern along the side of the rug.

The second hearth is smaller, using Wright’s Ferry 4×8″ brick tiles in a running bond for the base. The surround uses 2×8″ corner pieces to achieve the appearance of full sized brick.

Thank you, David and Margaret, for giving us the time to see your home and the beautiful installations! We really appreciate it!

Feature project: Harvest Moon Farm

This past weekend, Emily and Julie went to visit Harvest Moon Farm, the home of some of our customers. The beautiful horse farm is tucked back in the woods outside Coatesville, PA, and we were lucky enough to have fabulous weather to photograph indoors and out.

Harvest Moon Farm’s home, barn, and windmill:

Harvest moon homeHarvest moon backyardHarvest moon barnHarvest moon windmill

A few of their friendly horses.

Harvest moon horses-distanceHarvest moon horse-closeup

Brick Tile Installation

The Harvest Moon farm installation used Wright’s Ferry 4×8″ brick tiles in Marietta color mix, across their entryway, into a powder room, and throughout their kitchen.

Below, Julie, Inglenook Tile co-owner, and Walt, the homeowner, in the kitchen. Walt told us: “We love it, love it, love it! People who visit just can’t believe how much it has changed our home.”

We start looking in the front door at the brick tiles, their herringbone installation pattern stretching out into the kitchen area at the far end.

Looking in the front door

Here, a close up of the floor and a pair of riding boots.

Brick tiles and riding boots

A side view of the entryway, the front door, and a lovely wardrobe.

wardrobe and brick tile entryway

Part way down the hallway, our thin brick tiles make a foray into the powder room, where a horse rug complements the thin brick flooring. Also, looking back into the hallway from the powder room.

Powder room with brick tilesPowder room sink

The powder room door, made of reclaimed wood from the 1700’s, has a notch in it to allow the home’s Jack Russell terriers free access. The door molding and wainscoting are both from fences at Harvest moon farm, reclaimed for the house when they were replaced outdoors.

Dog door and brick tiles

Next, we walk into the kitchen, where Julie admires the thin brick tiles.

Julie looks at thin brick floor

Several views of the kitchen toward the island and its Inglenook brick floor:

Harvest moon kitchen thin brick floorHarvest moon kitchen thin brick floor

The kitchen table, overlooking the backyard, barn, and pastures and a closeup of our thin brick.

Harvest moon kitchen table

Inglenook brick tile kitchen floor

Finally, the transition from the kitchen’s brick tile flooring to the dining room’s wood floor.

Transition from thin brick to wood flooring

Thank you so much to Walt and Tandy for inviting us to visit your home. We’re so glad that you are pleased with your Inglenook Tiles!

Introducing Color Mixes!

In our past 5 years of business, we’ve noticed that customers order similar color combinations for our brick tiles. We’d ask: “Do you want wood ash? How about some black or fire-scorched tiles? Any white? Or do you want them more plain? Are you interested in more red or more brown tones?”

The number of choices seems daunting, yet time after time, our customers settled on the same handful of color combinations. In order to simplify the selection process, then, we’ve organized these common choices into “Color mixes.” All color mixes are available on all styles of our brick tiles. Indeed, in the color mix photographs below, 4×8″ Wright’s Ferry, 4×8″ Traditional Antique, 4×8″ King Street, 7×3.5″ Summer Kitchen, 7.5×3.75″ Rutherford, 2×8″ Lancaster Running bond, and 2×4″ Flemish bond brick tiles are all pictured (see brick tile types in parentheses).

Each color mix is described below, named for a town in central PA. Click on photos to enlarge.

Interested in samples?

Visit our website: www.inglenooktile.com or call 717.442.0514 to request them.

Marietta: Marietta color mix embodies the classic color combinations of Inglenook brick tiles. Wood ash and blackened tiles complement our standard brick red colors to achieve the ancient appearance of antique brick. (Wright’s Ferry)

Old Strasburg:Named for the salmon tones of the brick homes in historic Strasburg, PA, the Old Strasburg color mix stays in the warm red tones of our standard brick tiles. (Lancaster Running Bond)
Old Strasburg color mix
Elizabethtown: Elizabethtown color mix combines equal amounts of the standard brick red tone with the blackened look of our “fire-scorched” tiles. (Traditional Antique)

Honeybrook:Honeybrook combines the best of our brown, earthy tones. Brick tiles from gas kiln reduction firings are added to browned-standard bricks and sprinkled liberally with wood ash to achieve this antique look. (Summer Kitchen)

Honeybrook Color mix

Providence: From the belly of our new gas kiln, Providence is the newest color mix for our brick tiles. With natural hues created by a reduction firing, the Providence is a rich spectrum of browns and earthy reds, burnt deeper along the bricks’ edges as though exposed to open flame. Luminous white tones on several tiles in each box complete this historic look. (King Street)
Providence color mix

Mount Gretna: Mount Gretna color mix contains the palettes of Providence color mix, but without the white tones for a deeper spectrum of earthy brick colors. (Rutherford)

Mount Gretna color mix

Savannah: Savannah, as the only color mix named for a town outside central Pennsylvania, honors the stately brick homes and riverfront buildings of Savannah, GA. Savannah celebrates the chipping white paint adorning many of these tiles as well as those found in other areas of the South. Savannah is typically mixed with our standard brick red tones. (Lancaster Running Bond and Flemish Bond)

Savannah color  mix

Clinker: The Clinker color mix originated for our 2×4” Flemish bond brick tile. Clinkers were used in brick buildings in the 18th and 19th century in the classic Flemish bond pattern. Originating from Dutch klinckaerd, the word literally means “something that clinks” (referring to the sound produced when one was struck). The brick firing process burned the ends of bricks closest to the heat creating very hard, darkened clinkers with a slight sheen caused by melting sand. Our Clinker Flemish Bond brick paver designs capture this burned effect for historic flemish bond patterns and other decorative brick veneer installations. They are typically mixed in with other Inglenook tile color mixes. (Lancaster Running Bond and Flemish Bond)

Clinker color mix

New Installations

Before installations are put on our website, we will be posting them here, giving you a first look at new projects. We are excited to share these nine recent installations with you!

Click on images to enlarge.

Wall Installation: Lancaster Running Bond 2×8″ brick tile: Custom color mix including many white and fire-scorched pieces.

Wall installation

Arched Ceiling in a Home Bar: Lancaster Running Bond 2×8″ brick tile: “Old Strasburg” color mix. Second photo shows a closeup of the arched ceiling.

Arched Ceiling

Arched ceiling closeup

Sunroom floor with Accent Tiles: Wright’s Ferry 4×8″ brick tile: “Marietta” color mix. Second photo has tile accent piece detail. This project used a wide grout line with its herringbone installation pattern.

Sunroom Floor

Floor accent detail

Entryway floor: Wright’s Ferry 4×8″ brick tile: “Old Strasburg” color mix. This installation in running bond pattern extends through the hall into the front vestibule.

Hallway installation

Kitchen Wall and Floor: Wright’s Ferry 4×8″ brick tile laid on the floor in Basketweave pattern: Marietta color mix. On the wall, Lancaster Running Bond 2×8″ brick tile: “Marietta” color mix.

Kitchen installation

Wall installation

Kitchen Backsplash and Gas Fireplace surround: All portions of the installation use 2×8″ Lancaster Running Bond brick tile in a custom color mix.

Kitchen backsplash

Fireplace surround

Fireplace Surround

Kitchen Nook: 2×8″ Lancaster Running Bond brick tile: “Marietta” color mix.

Kitchen cubby wall

Kitchen floor: Wright’s Ferry 4×8″ brick tile: “Marietta” color mix. Second photo shows the transition from the brick tile to the dining room’s wood floor.

Kitchen Floor

Floor transition

Mudroom: Wright’s Ferry 4×8″ brick tile: custom color mix. This installation left grout in the tile texture, adding to the mudroom’s rustic look. Notice the great “dog shower” in the back left hand area!

Mudroom Installation

Visit our website: www.inglenooktile.com or call 717.442.0514 for more information.