Old Strasburg color mix

Feature Project: Pemberton Hall Visitors Center

Historic Site, Salisbury MD
Wright’s Ferry 4×8″ Brick Tiles, Running Bond Pattern

This thin brick veneer installation is in the Visitors Center of historic Pemberton Hall, a circa 1741 plantation home in Salisbury, MD. The buildings and surrounding land have been made into a park with miles of wetland trails and many day camps and outdoors groups often using the space for learning and play.

The Visitors Center building is a reproduction tobacco barn used for educational purposes. Inglenook’s 4×8″ brick paver designs fit the ticket for the interior brick flooring that is both historic-looking and rugged enough for the pounding of many little feet. This project was commissioned by the Maryland Parks and recreation system. In the picture above, the Pemberton Hall with an inset of the reproduction tobacco barn that used Inglenook brick tiles.

The entryway of the Visitors Center, by itself with an inset of children emerging from the learning center. This entire installation used Inglenook Tile “Wright’s Ferry” 4×8″ brick tiles in Old Strasburg color mix.

The educational room from various angles.

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Introducing Color Mixes!

In our past 5 years of business, we’ve noticed that customers order similar color combinations for our brick tiles. We’d ask: “Do you want wood ash? How about some black or fire-scorched tiles? Any white? Or do you want them more plain? Are you interested in more red or more brown tones?”

The number of choices seems daunting, yet time after time, our customers settled on the same handful of color combinations. In order to simplify the selection process, then, we’ve organized these common choices into “Color mixes.” All color mixes are available on all styles of our brick tiles. Indeed, in the color mix photographs below, 4×8″ Wright’s Ferry, 4×8″ Traditional Antique, 4×8″ King Street, 7×3.5″ Summer Kitchen, 7.5×3.75″ Rutherford, 2×8″ Lancaster Running bond, and 2×4″ Flemish bond brick tiles are all pictured (see brick tile types in parentheses).

Each color mix is described below, named for a town in central PA. Click on photos to enlarge.

Interested in samples?

Visit our website: www.inglenooktile.com or call 717.442.0514 to request them.

Marietta: Marietta color mix embodies the classic color combinations of Inglenook brick tiles. Wood ash and blackened tiles complement our standard brick red colors to achieve the ancient appearance of antique brick. (Wright’s Ferry)

Old Strasburg:Named for the salmon tones of the brick homes in historic Strasburg, PA, the Old Strasburg color mix stays in the warm red tones of our standard brick tiles. (Lancaster Running Bond)
Old Strasburg color mix
Elizabethtown: Elizabethtown color mix combines equal amounts of the standard brick red tone with the blackened look of our “fire-scorched” tiles. (Traditional Antique)

Honeybrook:Honeybrook combines the best of our brown, earthy tones. Brick tiles from gas kiln reduction firings are added to browned-standard bricks and sprinkled liberally with wood ash to achieve this antique look. (Summer Kitchen)

Honeybrook Color mix

Providence: From the belly of our new gas kiln, Providence is the newest color mix for our brick tiles. With natural hues created by a reduction firing, the Providence is a rich spectrum of browns and earthy reds, burnt deeper along the bricks’ edges as though exposed to open flame. Luminous white tones on several tiles in each box complete this historic look. (King Street)
Providence color mix

Mount Gretna: Mount Gretna color mix contains the palettes of Providence color mix, but without the white tones for a deeper spectrum of earthy brick colors. (Rutherford)

Mount Gretna color mix

Savannah: Savannah, as the only color mix named for a town outside central Pennsylvania, honors the stately brick homes and riverfront buildings of Savannah, GA. Savannah celebrates the chipping white paint adorning many of these tiles as well as those found in other areas of the South. Savannah is typically mixed with our standard brick red tones. (Lancaster Running Bond and Flemish Bond)

Savannah color  mix

Clinker: The Clinker color mix originated for our 2×4” Flemish bond brick tile. Clinkers were used in brick buildings in the 18th and 19th century in the classic Flemish bond pattern. Originating from Dutch klinckaerd, the word literally means “something that clinks” (referring to the sound produced when one was struck). The brick firing process burned the ends of bricks closest to the heat creating very hard, darkened clinkers with a slight sheen caused by melting sand. Our Clinker Flemish Bond brick paver designs capture this burned effect for historic flemish bond patterns and other decorative brick veneer installations. They are typically mixed in with other Inglenook tile color mixes. (Lancaster Running Bond and Flemish Bond)

Clinker color mix

Feature Project: “Primitive Hall”

Every now and then, we plan to pick out a special project and feature it on our blog. This is the first of these posts. Click on images to enlarge.

Primitive Hall exterior

This “New Old Home” project is a historic reproduction of a building called “Primitive Hall.” The home is located in Chester county, Pennsylvania, an area steeped in antique homes and historic sites, such as Valley Forge, where Washington’s troops weathered the winter in the Revolutionary war. Like many of our customers, this family loved the look of an old home but wanted to avoid the constant maintenance often associated with them. Inglenook Tile was their choice for several areas of their home, including in the sunroom, dining room, and hallway and on a custom kitchen backsplash.

The first picture captures the sunroom where”Traditional Antique” 4×8″ brick tiles are installed in a classic herringbone pattern. Primitive Hall has “Old Strasburg” color mix for all its Inglenook brick tiles.

Sunroom

From the sunroom, the brick tile flooring moves into the dining room. The graceful transition between herringbone pattern and the dining room’s running bond is marked by a step.

Transition to dining room

Inside the dining room, the antique corner cupboard and table set complete the authentic historic appearance.

Dining Room

Outside the dining room, the “Traditional Antique” 4×8″ brick tiles continue into the hallway.

Hallway

Inglenook Tiles also find their way into the kitchen, taking a prominent place on the stovetop backsplash. The custom backsplash design uses 4×4″ brick toned tiles bordered by 2×2″ tiles. Our Vegetable accent tiles, taken from antique German candy molds and glazed in “Fern” glaze, punctuate the design. The image below shows a close up of the backsplash design.

Backsplash design

Visit our website: www.inglenooktile.com or call 717.442.0514 for more information.

New Installations

Before installations are put on our website, we will be posting them here, giving you a first look at new projects. We are excited to share these nine recent installations with you!

Click on images to enlarge.

Wall Installation: Lancaster Running Bond 2×8″ brick tile: Custom color mix including many white and fire-scorched pieces.

Wall installation

Arched Ceiling in a Home Bar: Lancaster Running Bond 2×8″ brick tile: “Old Strasburg” color mix. Second photo shows a closeup of the arched ceiling.

Arched Ceiling

Arched ceiling closeup

Sunroom floor with Accent Tiles: Wright’s Ferry 4×8″ brick tile: “Marietta” color mix. Second photo has tile accent piece detail. This project used a wide grout line with its herringbone installation pattern.

Sunroom Floor

Floor accent detail

Entryway floor: Wright’s Ferry 4×8″ brick tile: “Old Strasburg” color mix. This installation in running bond pattern extends through the hall into the front vestibule.

Hallway installation

Kitchen Wall and Floor: Wright’s Ferry 4×8″ brick tile laid on the floor in Basketweave pattern: Marietta color mix. On the wall, Lancaster Running Bond 2×8″ brick tile: “Marietta” color mix.

Kitchen installation

Wall installation

Kitchen Backsplash and Gas Fireplace surround: All portions of the installation use 2×8″ Lancaster Running Bond brick tile in a custom color mix.

Kitchen backsplash

Fireplace surround

Fireplace Surround

Kitchen Nook: 2×8″ Lancaster Running Bond brick tile: “Marietta” color mix.

Kitchen cubby wall

Kitchen floor: Wright’s Ferry 4×8″ brick tile: “Marietta” color mix. Second photo shows the transition from the brick tile to the dining room’s wood floor.

Kitchen Floor

Floor transition

Mudroom: Wright’s Ferry 4×8″ brick tile: custom color mix. This installation left grout in the tile texture, adding to the mudroom’s rustic look. Notice the great “dog shower” in the back left hand area!

Mudroom Installation

Visit our website: www.inglenooktile.com or call 717.442.0514 for more information.

Preservation Alliance Award

Delancey Street home nowThe photographs pictured here are of “Private Residence Delancey Street,” winner of the Preservation Alliance for Greater Philadelphia 2008 Award of Recognition. We are very excited to have our brick tile flooring showcased in the kitchen of this beautiful historic home. The renovation was done by Hanson General Contracting in Philadelphia, PA. If you have a renovation project in the Philadelphia area we strongly recommend this great company– their contact information is below.

Here is the house after the renovation (above and below right) and in its “younger” years:
Delancey Street home, historically

Delancey Street home

Finally, the sunlight streaming across our Wright’s Ferry antique brick tiles in the home’s breakfast nook. The tile color mix is “Old Strasburg,” and the brick pavers are installed in a classic “running bond” pattern throughout the kitchen area. Click to enlarge image.

Delancey Street home Wrights Ferry brick tile floor

Visit our website: www.inglenooktile.com or call 717.442.0514 for more information.

Hanson General Contracting, Inc., Fine Building and Historic Preservation
Christopher M. Hanson, principal
214 Kalos Street
Philadelphia, PA 19128
P: 215.483.8338
F: 215.483.2088
chrish@hgcinc.biz
www.hgcinc.biz

Architect: John Milner Architects, Chadds Ford, PA