brick veneer

Updated List Of Brick Tile Styles

There are a number of brick tile styles that are not yet on our website. I would like to introduce you to our assortment of brick tiles!
We have three styles that are roughly 4×8″ :
Wright’s Ferry
Tumbled sides and textured surface
Traditional Antique
Straight sides and textured surface
King Street
Straight sides, smoother surface
We have four styles that are slightly smaller than  4×8″:
Rutherford
Makes a good basket weave. 3-1/2×7-1/2″, straight sides and smoother surface, like King Street
Summer Kitchen
Just like Rutherford, but 3-1/2″x7″
Wimers Mill
The same size as Summer Kitchen, but with a textured top and rugged sides
San Sebastian
3×8-3/4″, straight sides, smoother top.
We also have 2×8″ and 2×4″ style for the “side” view of bricks. These sizes are most commonly used on walls, chimneys and other vertical surfaces, but they have also been used on floors and even arched ceilings.
Lancaster Running Bond
2×8″, tumbled sides and texture like the Wright’s Ferry
Watch for our next post with side-by-side comparisons of our various styles of tiles!
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Featured Installation: “Pig House” — a guest house renovation

Concept of Lea projectJake and Gretchen Lea bought their lovely farm in Berks County, Pennsylvania, in 1972, and raised their twins there. The twins grew up, and the Leas decided that they needed a more private place to stay when they visited their childhood home with their families. 

Gretchen is a designer, and saw our tiles at the Historic Home Show, in Valley Forge, Pennsylvania. She and Jake were planning a guest house on their property, and knew right away that our tiles would be ideal for the floors. Gretchen is full of imagination, and could see the possibilities in the touches of whimsy we could provide for her floors. In her work, she likes to include little “surprises” in the rooms she designs…which makes her a kindred spirit to Julie, owner/designer at Inglenook Tile.  

Jake enjoys piloting his small plane, so one day he and Gretchen flew to a small Lancaster County airport to see the tiles again. Julie picked them up at the airport, and brought them to the warehouse, so that they could see the full selection of styles and colors, and customize their order.  

In 2007, Jake and Gretchen decided to level the old pig sty on the property, where they raised pigs when the children were young. On the site, they built a new “pig sty” guest house, designed to complement the other buildings on the property. It has two bedrooms, a powder room, a full bath with a washer/dryer, a kitchen/dining room, a living room, and upstairs hallway. When Gretchen was planning the floors, she wanteFloor details lead a few tiles of pigs, to reflect the history of the old pig house that once stood on the site. We created a brick tile with an inset pig sculpture, to be placed randomly in the floor (see detail picture). 

Now when the twins visit, they stay in their own guesthouse. There are other guests that also enjoy the “pig house”; for example, a director from California recently took up residence there for a month and a half, while he worked with a local non-profit theater. Visitors can fish in the pond, swim in the pool, and walk the 2 fields of wildflowers on the Lea’s eighty acres of Berks County farmland. They have allowed their property to be used as a site for Geocaching (www.geocaching.com), and sometimes they enjoy seeing families digging for the “treasure” in their woods. Gretchen’s creativity is not yet satisfied with the “pig house” — she has plans to create additional living space in the tower silo.  

Lea kitchen

When asked how she feels about the tiles, now that they are installed, Gretchen says, “They fit in beautifully, and gave us a rustic look at a reasonable price.” She added that, as a designer, she appreciates working with companies that take pride in their work. 

Lea stairway 

If you are interested in working with Gretchen, she can be reached at glea316@ceinetworks.com, or at 610-367-6773. Her website is www.gleainteriordesign.com .

Home Office Installation

 These installation pictures feature an interior wall in a home office. Our customer, Steven, wanted brick shelves incorporated into the walls for candles and other accent pieces. Lancaster Running Bond 2×8″ brick tile and custom brick tile shelves created the effect he desired.

 Steven said the following about his experience with Inglenook Tile Design:

“The tiles I purchased from Ingelnook were great.  Their customer service is excellent and all the advice and guidance on how to complete the project was very much appreciated.  Everyone loves this wall in my home office.  I get compliments from everyone that walks in.  I’m very happy that I went forward with this project and Ingelnook was a great choice.
I’m definitely going back to Ingelnook for my next tile project!!!”

Watch for more new installation photos, coming soon!!

Installing Tile over a Vertical Surface

Kitchen cubby wall

At Inglenook Tile, some of the most dramatic installations of our brick tiles have been on walls, ceilings and chimney boxes. Brick tile can be installed on all of these surfaces without needing to pour concrete footers or otherwise add extra support, one of the major advantages of brick tile over full-sized brick.

Installing brick tile vertically, however, can pose a conceptual challenge to many customers– how exactly do you install it? How does the surface need to be prepped? Are there differences between indoor and outdoor installations? How does the installation process change if the tile is being laid over wood-framed walls, cement block, or drywall?

To help answer some of these questions, we turned to Jim Glessner, a very knowledgeable installer who has laid numerous Inglenook Tile projects. These directions and tips apply to our brick tiles as well as any other unglazed tiles that you might use on a vertical surface.

Directions: Installing Brick Tile on a Vertical Surface

Depending on the surface type you install over, these steps will be slightly different. Read more details in the surface-specific sections below.

  1. Prepare surface by screwing backerboard firmly into the wall studs, if this step is necessary for your surface. Cover the entire wall area that you intend to tile with backerboard.
  2. Jim emphasizes the importance of taking the time to lay out your tiles properly before you begin to install. Take careful measurements and lay out your tiles, keeping 1/4″ grout lines in mind. You might want to draw out the final lines on the wall.
    • Pay special attention to the final, highest row when laying out the tiles. You don’t want to be left cutting a small sliver of tile for the final row at the ceiling– it ruins the illusion of full-brick. If the final row lays out as a less than the full tile height, split the difference between the first, lowest row and the last, highest row. This way, you will have the appearance of full-sized brick for the entire wall.
    • If you are installing with corner pieces, as for a chimney, horizontal layout is also crucial to avoid cutting a much shorter tile piece immediately before the corner piece. As with the vertical wall layout, plan ahead and spread out the cutting between two or more tiles so that they are all a similar size.
  3. Once you have laid out the wall installation, install the tiles using standard mastic and 1/4″ spacers. Start at the bottom and work your way up, row-by-row. Be very careful to keep the rows plumb as you install tiles across the wall area.
    • For small wall areas, you may choose to use speedset thinset instead of standard mastic or thinset. You will need to work quickly if you choose to use speedset.
  4. Allow 12-16 hours for the mastic to cure for standard mastic; 4 hours for speedset thinset.
  5. After the mastic has cured, pull out the spacers and prepare your grout or mortar.
    • Jim recommends mixing mortar in a bucket with a 1/2 inch mixing drill
    • The mortar should be a thick liquid consistency, much thinner than the mortar used to install tiles on floors. You should be able to scoop up mortar and pour it into joints with a trowel.
  6. Grout in-between the tiles and strike the joints. Jim strikes the vertical joints first and then the horizontal ones.
  7. Allow 24 hours for the mortar to dry.
  8. Seal the tiles and mortar with a penetrating sealer of your choice to allow easy cleaning and protection from water.

Installing Over Drywall

For installing brick tile over existing drywall walls, Jim tells us that you have two options depending on whether or not you want to remove and re-install your trim or wainscoting.

Option 1: Lay tiles directly on drywall

The first option is to leave the trim in place and install the tiles directly over the drywall. Our brick tile and most other tile is thin enough to lay flush against standard trim without an unusual transition from the trim to tile. This option has the disadvantage of being less resilient. For instance, as Jim explains, if the wall were to have a hard impact, such as a 2-by-4 hitting wall with some force, the tiles would go through the drywall. If you choose this option, start at step 2 in the above directions and then follow as given.

Option 2: Lay tiles on backerboard over drywall

Installing the tiles over backerboard makes the wall more resilient to impact, but requires the removal of all trim from the wall area before installation. You then screw backerboard through the drywall, making sure to hit studs. You might wish to glue up the backerboard and then screw it in. Follow the remaining directions as given above. After sealing the tiles and allowing them to dry, reinstall the trim over the tile wall.

Installing Over Wood-framed Walls (New Construction)

For new construction, you generally will be starting your installation project with a wood-framed wall. Installing over a framed wall simply requires screwing the backerboard into the wall studs, exactly as the above directions detail.

Installing Over Concrete Block

Concrete block is simplest surface over which to install brick tile. You can stick the tiles directly to the concrete block with mastic or thinset. Skip to Step 2 above and follow the directions as given.

Interior vs. Exterior Wall Installations

The technique is the same whether you install tiles indoors or outdoors, but the products you use will be slightly different.

  • When installing exterior walls or chimneys, Jim recommends laying tiles with mastic that has a much higher portland cement content. This type of mastic is more expensive but is much more pliable, allowing the tiles to move with the movement of the building once installed.
  • Make sure to seal exterior tiles to protect against rain. Use a sealer designed for exterior use.
  • Only use tiles that have been tested for freeze-thaw resilience if living in an area with cold winters. Inglenook brick tiles have been successfully tested for freeze-thaw resistance by the Tile Council of America.

Not interested in installing yourself and live in central Pennsylvania? Jim can be contacted at 717.672.1987.

Feature Project: Pemberton Hall Visitors Center

Historic Site, Salisbury MD
Wright’s Ferry 4×8″ Brick Tiles, Running Bond Pattern

This thin brick veneer installation is in the Visitors Center of historic Pemberton Hall, a circa 1741 plantation home in Salisbury, MD. The buildings and surrounding land have been made into a park with miles of wetland trails and many day camps and outdoors groups often using the space for learning and play.

The Visitors Center building is a reproduction tobacco barn used for educational purposes. Inglenook’s 4×8″ brick paver designs fit the ticket for the interior brick flooring that is both historic-looking and rugged enough for the pounding of many little feet. This project was commissioned by the Maryland Parks and recreation system. In the picture above, the Pemberton Hall with an inset of the reproduction tobacco barn that used Inglenook brick tiles.

The entryway of the Visitors Center, by itself with an inset of children emerging from the learning center. This entire installation used Inglenook Tile “Wright’s Ferry” 4×8″ brick tiles in Old Strasburg color mix.

The educational room from various angles.

Julie’s Update: New kiln and other news

The most exciting event this week was yesterday’s delivery of our new Bailey gas cart kiln! We have been making many preparations for its arrival, such as putting on a new roof, pouring a new (level) concrete floor, and adding to the size of our workspace.

This kiln will improve our lives in many ways. Most importantly, we will be able to cycle many more tiles through our kilns, and shorten the lead times on most orders. We will also be able to load and unload it without crawling inside, so it will more user-friendly.

It is a sophisticated kiln that regulates itself, and we will not be required to baby-sit it on

evenings and weekends as it fires, as we do our present gas kiln.(Perhaps this fall we will get wood chopped for our fireplaces, after all!) So much of our time over the past year has been taken up waiting for the gas kiln to finish its firing cycle.

With the kiln, we also took delivery on an additional electric slab roller, which is part of our production process. With it, we will be able to add another line of workers, and fill that gas kiln regularly. Next, we will need to make a larger break room! With our new equipment, we are ready for the busy fall building season.

We will welcome Ben tomorrow, another veteran worker from the Coatesville VA Hospital.

We are excitedly anticipating an article that will be published soon in Architectural Digest, featuring a home renovation that used a large number of our Summer Kitchen brick tiles. When we have more information on this, we will share it in our blog.

Cheers,

Julie Good-Kruger

Inglenook Tile Design

Cleaning Review: Microfiber Mops

Once in a while, a customer will come to us with questions about the type of mop to use on their brick tile floor.

For the assiduous mopper, the typical sponge mop might not hold up to frequent scrubbing, especially on our more rustic tile styles, such as Wright’s Ferry. Trying to address this problem, we came across microfiber mops, a relatively new development in the floor cleaning sphere.

Microfiber mops use static electricity to trap dust and dirt, allegedly getting floors cleaner with less effort. They also are much more durable than the typical sponge or loop mop. We were intrigued by the possibilities of this product and purchased a heavy-duty microfiber mop that could be used wet and dry to test out on our home’s brick tile floors.

Read more about the product and our assessment of its usefulness below.

Heavy-Duty Dust/Wet Microfiber Mop kit

Price: $25-$30

Self-description:

This description of the product is from Shopmicrofiber.com, the website from which we purchased our mop kit. Microfiber mops are sold on many different websites– shop around for the best deals and features.

The Microfiber Heavy-Duty Mop is a top-quality, industrial-strength alternative to our classic Microfiber Standard Mop. Specially built from sturdy, resilient aluminum hardware, it will easily stand up to continuous, intense use.

The Microfiber Dust Pad is made from supercharged, electrostatic Microfiber that quickly attracts and holds dust, dirt, pet hairs, lint, crumbs and more, removing it from your floors and keeping it out of the air. The powerful Microfiber Mop Wet Pad easily tackles even the dirtiest floors, cleaning away dirt and grime, oils and spills, smears, smudges and scuff marks, leaving floors clean and streak-free

Microfiber Mops are a safe and economical alternative to traditional mops because they provide a thorough clean using only water – no harsh or expensive chemicals needed. The microscopic, split, wedge-shaped fibers draw in and attract dirt and stains, leaving behind only a clean and sparkling floor. Microfiber Mop Wet and Dust Pads are machine washable at least 200 times, saving you money and saving the environment from needless disposable waste.

Microfiber Mops are also easy to use, effortlessly surpassing all other types of floor mops. Microfiber is super absorbent, able to hold up to 7 times its weight in liquid, so mops won’t drip. Plus, they are lightweight and easy to maneuver, enabling you to cover large spaces in a short time.

Because Microfiber is safe enough to use on any hard floor surface, including hardwood, tile, marble, linoleum, stone, and painted surfaces, it is ideal for every room in your home. Make a quick pass through the room with the Microfiber Dust Pad, quickly removing dirt, dust, hair and more. Then use the Microfiber Mop Wet Pad to wash floors for a bright, clean finish. Quickly clean up spills in the kitchen and bathroom, wipe away mud in your entryways, and more.

Our Assessment:

I first tried our microfiber mop dry on our most rustic floor– our entryway brick tiles are much more pitted than anything Inglenook Tile sells today, meaning its success on this floor would be a good measure of success on all others.

The mop is very light and glided across the brick tile surface easily, not catching on any of the rugged grooves. As advertised it did, indeed, do an excellent job picking up the dirt and other small particles. The larger particles were left behind, however, indicating to me that the dry microfiber mop is best used for maintenance cleaning during the week with a thorough vacuuming on cleaning day. I removed the microfiber pad and shook it out well outside when I completed the floor, an action that seemed to restore it fairly well to its original pristine white state. Machine-washing is also an option.

The next test, wet mopping.

I used a warm, dilute solution of water and Stone Logix cleaner to wash our brick tile floors with the microfiber mop. Again, the mop worked well to pick up dirt and dust, leaving the floor with a pleasant, clean gleam. The logistics of using the mop were a bit complicated, however.

First, my bucket could not accommodate the 18″ wide, rigid mop head, so I removed the microfiber pad (an easy task– it’s attached with Velcro), dipped it by hand into the warm cleaning water, wrung it out a bit, and then re-stuck it to the mop. All those familiar with mopping see the obvious problem here. Every time the mop needs to be rinsed and wrung as you mop the floor, the pad must be removed and the whole task done by hand. A specialized microfiber wringer bucket I have since located online has the potential to ellievate this troublesome part of the mopping process, though.

One other complaint– the little metal slides that attached the mop head to the handle of the mop slid out of place several times when I moved the mop suddenly in one direction, leaving my mop in 2 pieces. I would then have to reassemble the unit; again, not a hard task but a somewhat annoying one.

When I finished mopping, I did one final rinse with fresh water, wrung it out and hung it up to dry. No problems there.

Bottom Line:

The hype about microfiber mops has merit. They are indeed excellent at catching dirt and very resilient to the texture of our brick floor. I doubt I will need to replace the microfiber pad for a long time. However, wetting and wringing out the microfiber pad by hand each time the pad needs to be rinsed is a daunting task. I will likely need to buy one of the microfiber mop wringer buckets before I undertake a major mopping project. If you are a frequent mopper and are concerned about a sponge mop on your brick tile floor, this is definitely the mop to buy. But do yourself a favor and buy a wringer bucket at the same time.